Daily Archives: May 2, 2021

STFS zoom-only meeting Saturday May 15th 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM featuring author Ann Ralph talks about Grow a Little Fruit Tree: Simple Pruning Techniques for Small-Space, Easy-Harvest Fruit Trees

To lessen COVID-19 spread, the Seattle Tree Fruit Society meeting Saturday May 15th 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM is only online.

The meeting will begin with a brief business meeting, followed by a presentation by author Ann Ralph.

Why Little? Grow A Little Fruit Tree offers a revolutionary vision for backyard fruit trees: a simple and ingenious technique that uses timed pruning to keep fruit trees as short as six feet tall… …they are easy to care for and produce fruit in quantities we’re likely to be able to use. Small trees create the opportunity to have more trees in the backyard and to plant different varieties of fruit to ripen all summer, through fall, and even into winter.


Timed pruning offers a revolutionary approach to fruit tree care, winter prune for shape and summer prune to keep trees small and easy. This presentation covers fruit tree basics: the simple logic of pruning, how to prune for short stature and easy harvest, early training, seasonal routines, and pest and disease control. You’ll learn about the benefits of small trees, getting started, pruning for aesthetics, and how to engage in the pleasures of the pruning conversation.

Ann Ralph is the author of Grow a Little Fruit Tree: Simple Pruning Techniques for Small-Space, Easy-Harvest Fruit Trees. Publishers Weekly called it “a thrilling read for the backyard farmer.” She was the fruit tree specialist at Berkeley Horticultural Nursery and has 20 years of retail nursery experience. She promotes practical, artful, and commonsense methods for the garden generally and fruit trees in particular.

Goodie U, STFS Board Member, reminds everyone that the Ann Ralph zoom meeting will be recorded so attendees not wanting to be recorded should mute microphone and turn off their video. Goodie U made the upcoming Ann Ralph presentation happen. Thanks, Goodie.

If you know any non-STFS individual interested in attending this zoom meeting, please forward this zoom invite so more can benefit from Ann’s presentation. 

Zoom invite info

The most recent version of free Zoom software can be downloaded onto your computer from https://zoom.us/download. Zoom Client for Meetings probably will work best.

Mike Ewanciw is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Seattle Tree Fruit Society meeting & Presentation

Time: May 15, 2021 10:00 AM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/ 83884386229?pwd= dGhmR1oyZlJXQzNtRGFQRVpkdmJmQT 09

Meeting ID: 838 8438 6229

Passcode: 003071

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+16699009128,,83884386229#,,,, *003071# US (San Jose)

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Meeting ID: 838 8438 6229

Passcode: 003071

Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/ kcS6CzjNZp

STFS sells extreme maggot barriers

Seattle Tree Fruit Society sells extreme maggot barriers to support educational activities.

This year, the manufacturer has redesigned the maggot barriers. Extreme maggot barriers are available through the mail though the price and quantity per package has changed. Extreme maggot barriers will also be available for sale June 5th at STFS’s demo orchard in Seattle’s Magnuson Park during the thinning/bagging/draping demonstration.

Extreme Maggot barrier info and order form is accessible at:

STFS-2021-maggot-barrier-order-form.pdf (seattletreefruitsociety.com)

or cut and paste following URL into your web browser:

http://www.seattletreefruitsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/STFS-2021-maggot-barrier-order-form.pdf

Extreme maggot barriers, when placed over fruitset immediately after springtime thinning, protect apples, pears, Asian pears and other fruits from later damage by apple maggot and other insects. Extreme maggot barriers must be secured around the developing fruit’s stem and will stretch as the fruit grows over summer. After harvest in late summer and fall, extreme maggot barriers can be removed from mature fruit and washed for re-use the following season.